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Monday, 30 December 2013

The following is an explanation of the numeracy stages:

THE NUMERACY STAGES:  The stages of the Numeracy Project are listed and explained below.  There are many real-life experiences that you can have with your child at all of these stages.  It is important that your child is confident at the stage they're at before they move on.  As your child's teacher, I am happy to discuss which knowledge and strategy stages your child is working at and towards. 

 Emergent (Stage 0)· They are learning to rote count.

One-to-one counting (Stage 1)· They can count up to ten objects.

Counting from One on Materials (Stage 2)· They can add and subtract using their fingers or objects (up to ten)· When they add 4 + 3 they will start counting from one.· Children can count numbers from 0 –20 (backwards and forwards).

Counting from One by using Images (Stage 3)· They can see objects in their mind rather than using real objects· When they add 4 + 3 they will still start counting from one.· Children can count numbers from 0-20 (backwards and forwards).

Counting on—Advanced Counting (Stage 4)· When adding 4 + 3 they will count on from four (4,5,6,7)· Children can work with numbers from 0—100· At this stage children may use materials or may image and in some cases might 'just know it'· Children use skip-counting as an early means of multiplying e.g. 5 x 2 as 2,4,6,8,10.

Early Additive -part-whole (Stage 5)· They can separate numbers into useful units to solve addition and subtraction, e.g. 7 + 8 can be done as 7 + 7 + 1 (doubles) or 9 + 7 is the same as 10 + 6 (tidy tens).· Children can work with numbers from 0 - 1000· They will recognise and begin to use symbols for common fractions e.g. 1/2, 1/3, 1/4, 1/5, 1/10.

Advanced Additive part-whole (Stage 6)· They can separate numbers into useful units in a variety of ways to solve addition and subtraction, and are beginning to solve multiplication and division problems.· Children can work with numbers from 0 –1 000 000· This stage could also be called Early Multiplicative.



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